Bibliometrics

Bibliometrics
Rationalizing the extremes: introducing the citation distribution index
May 10, 2018
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The distribution of citations among the scientific literature is in many respects similar to the distribution of wealth in the Western World: a handful of articles receive most of the citations, while most of the articles receive few or no citations at all. The distribution of citations is indeed highly skewed and not well represented by its average (the so-called “Bill Gates effect” in the wealth distribution analogy). In fact, when the average is computed for entities that publish a small number of articles, a few highly cited articles could be enough to propel these entities into research superstardom. In this post, we’ll look at an alternative metric Science-Metrix has developed to address the limitations of averages, as well as some of the other metrics we explored to get to that point.
Bibliometrics Open access
1findr: discovery for the world of research
May 2, 2018
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As of last week, 1science is offering public access to its 1findr service. 1findr is a discovery and analytics platform for scholarly research, indexing an incredibly wide breadth of peer-reviewed journals. But just how broad is its coverage, and how does 1findr compare to alternative systems? In this post, we’ll measure up 1findr against the (also quite new) Dimensions platform from Digital Science. These two platforms represent new approaches to bibliographic data: 1findr is fed using harvesters that automatically collect, parse, complete and validate metadata from information online, whereas Dimensions aggregates and cross-links data from a variety of sources, accessed through institutional partnerships.
Bibliometrics
Positional analysis: from boring tables to sweet visuals
March 28, 2018
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At Science-Metrix we are obviously very focused on data—sweet, sweet data! We are also very aware that bibliometric data or pages and pages of analysis can be overwhelming and that more intuitive data presentation can help our clients to better understand their study results, which in turn helps them to take action on the findings we return to them. One graphic presentation we find particularly helpful is the positional analysis chart. Positional analysis is a way to visually depict two, three or even more indicators for a given set of entities instead of using a standard (and boring) table. Click through to the post to see how it works.
Bibliometrics
Mapping science: a guide to our Twitter series
March 14, 2018
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Over the course of 2018, we’ll be publishing a series of maps via the Science-Metrix Twitter feed to visually illustrate some dynamics of the global science ecosystem. This blog post is the anchor for that series, explaining why we think these maps are important and what exactly they represent.
Bibliometrics
Bibliometric fun facts
January 24, 2018
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Bibliometrics is a complex and nuanced field, and at times, we’ll admit, it’s even a little arcane. At Science-Metrix we take great pride in explaining indicators to clients: what they mean, how they are calculated, their strengths and weaknesses, and what they can and cannot do. As with so many things, examples provide a good entry point. Inspired by this, today I begin a new occasional series that heads back to basics to explain some common indicators and how we use them in house. In this first post, I’ll explore some “fun facts” that can be derived from a bibliometric database.
Bibliometrics Data mining Open access Science policy
2017: the best of ScienceMetrics.org
January 17, 2018
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Over the past year, the ScienceMetrics.org blog has grown considerably. We really appreciate our growing group of readers and all the interesting discussions that the blog has sparked. In today’s post, we’ll take a quick look back at 2017, and give you a year-in-review from our side of the “Publish” button.
Bibliometrics
Prestige and inequality in the ivory tower
December 18, 2017
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It’s no secret that we have an inequality problem within the hallowed walls of the academy. Much focus has been dedicated to problems of inequality—of status, of wage, of job security, of resulting social mobility, and beyond—mainly between tenured faculty and the growing precariat of contract teaching labour. The central importance of published research is often fingered as a central culprit in entrenching this inequality, and in this post I’ll explore the inequality of citations. The analytical approach is borrowed from Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century, his landmark work on economic inequality.
Bibliometrics Science policy
Nobel laureates and the economic impact of research: a case study
December 15, 2017
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In the course of another project, I recently ran some data on the publications of 37 laureates of the Nobel prizes in Medicine, Physics and Chemistry. The results raised eyebrows in the office: they showed that those laureates, recognized for the tremendous contribution their discoveries have made to humanity, have over the course of their careers produced knowledge that has been taken up in innovation—as measured by patent citations—more widely than the work of the average US or world scientist. While this was a “quick and dirty” case study, the results exemplify the great potential of the prizewinners’ work for producing economic returns to society.
Bibliometrics
Team diversity widget: how do you measure up?
December 6, 2017
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Collaboration and disciplinary diversity are hot topics in the science policy and research communities. At Science-Metrix, we've been working on multi-/inter-/trans-disciplinarity issues for a while now, and we figured that some of you might find it useful to have a tool you can use to take a quick measurement of the multidisciplinarity of your team. As part of our 15th anniversary celebrations, we've created a free widget that we’re sharing for just such a purpose. Any team can be measured—your research team in academia, a product team in your company, or even your Wednesday-night hockey team. In this post, we’ll explain what the disciplinarity widget does, how to interpret the measurements, and how you can use it yourself. We hope you enjoy the widget—a little birthday gift from us to you!
Bibliometrics Science policy
Metrics: state of the alt
November 8, 2017
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Discussions of research having impact were for a long time limited to citation tracking, to estimate how much one piece of work influences subsequent explorations. However, with calls for research to have impact on the broader society—breaking out of the closed circle of research feeding yet more research—there’s a lot of interest in seeing how we might trace that impact pathway as it breaks through the membrane insulating the world of research. Altmetrics has held the promise of tracking just such traces. At STI 2017, several leading researchers on the topic gave valuable updates on the state of the art, and their estimation is that we should be seriously cooling it with all the hype. This post sums up the points that stuck out to me from their various presentations, and tries to outline my takeaway of what we should be learning from altmetrics.