Bibliometrics

Bibliometrics Science policy
The death of indicators
November 1, 2017
0
, , , , ,
In last week’s post, I presented some of the major points of Rémi Barré’s keynote speech at STI 2017. In brief, he divides the evolution of S&T indicators into three phases. The first phase is one of indicators promising to elucidate (and thereby improve) the inner workings of science. The second phase is one of them being co-opted into the neoliberal turn, exposing scientific research to competitive pressures that Dr. Barré identifies as pushing science into multiple crises. The third phase is a casting off of the complicity with neoliberalism, using indicators to start opening up discussions about science & technology rather than shutting them down. In this post I’ll expand on this third phase.
Bibliometrics Science policy
Indicating a neoliberal tendency
October 25, 2017
2
, , , , , ,
Continuing on from my previous discussion of impact, the second keynote speech at the 2017 Science & Technology Indicators (STI) conference in Paris was given by Rémi Barré of IFRIS, who echoed many of the points raised by Ismael Rafols. Barré’s call to action—riffing on a very traditional theme—was, “Les indicateurs sont morts! Vive les indicateurs!” Indicators are dead! Long live indicators! The call was provocative, and his talk highlighted some interesting ways in which the struggles we face in research & innovation management are symptoms of a broad and powerful trend in the political sphere: neoliberalism.
Bibliometrics Higher education Science policy
Research impact now!
September 21, 2017
0
, , , , ,
In my previous post, I laid out some history of research assessment and measurement, all so that in this post I could explore research impact assessment, which was a major topic of discussion at the 2017 Science & Technology Indicators (STI) conference in Paris. In this post, I’ll summarize the major lines of discussion I encountered at STI, use the history from the last post as a basis for diagnosing those underlying challenges, and perhaps even hint at some avenues to resolve these tensions.
Bibliometrics Higher education Science policy
A short history of research impact
September 14, 2017
2
, , , , , ,
During the 2017 Science & Technology Indicators (STI) conference in Paris, a number of discussions touched on impact assessment, which has been a topic of growing interest within the research community. That researchers are increasingly aware of impact, impact pathways and impact assessments comes as no great shock, given that the research policy community is increasingly focusing on impact as the basis for funding decisions. The discussions at STI raised some substantive concerns with the current trajectory of discussions about research impact. In this post, I’ll lay out some relevant history (as I understand it) that contextualizes current discussions about impact. In the next installment, I’ll summarize those points from STI 2017 that stood out to me as the most insightful (and provocative), drawing on the history laid out here in order to explore what I think these comments reflect about the underlying research system.
Bibliometrics Data sources Higher education Science policy
Interdisciplinarity: the mutual adjustment of concept and indicator
December 8, 2016
0
, , , , ,
In their recently released report, Digital Science describe and assess the relationship between a range of candidate indicators for interdisciplinarity. Their objective is to assess the consistency between the indicators and attempt to discern a front runner in this race. Ultimately, though, they conclude that the indicators produce inconsistent findings, and finish with some remarks […]
Bibliometrics
Establishing the prevalence of the gender dimension in research
September 16, 2016
0
, , , , , , , ,
About 7% of social science research and about 4% of medicine and humanities integrate a gender dimension. In agricultural and natural sciences as well as engineering and technology there is a vanishingly small amount of research involving gender. Sweden’s research has the strongest commitment to researching gender issues, with almost 9% of social sciences and […]
Bibliometrics Open access
The many flavors of open access
August 5, 2016
0
, , , ,
Life used to be so simple. If you wanted to find a scholarly paper, you looked in a journal. If somebody asked you where a paper was, you gave them the name of the journal. With the rise of open access, things have gotten more complex, and not just a little more complex. In this […]
Bibliometrics Open access
OACA – the open access citation advantage
July 22, 2016
0
, ,
If you post your paper online somewhere outside a paywall, you join the majority of scholars and your paper will gain a citation advantage over papers available only through a journal. This has been demonstrated in recent research. A particular focus of research on open access publishing has been the hypothesis that open access papers […]
Bibliometrics Science policy
Taxonomy, objectivity and expectation
June 6, 2016
0
, ,
Measuring interdisciplinarity relies on objective taxonomies of science, but how does science policy influence this perceived objectivity and how can acknowledging this influence improve the construction of taxonomies?