Posts Tagged: evidence-based policymaking

Evaluation
Maximizing the use of evaluation findings
February 21, 2018
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In a 2006 survey of 1,140 American Evaluation Association members, 68% reported that their evaluation results were not used. This suggests a serious need for evaluation results to make it off the bookshelf and into the hands of intended audiences. This week’s blog post looks at how we, as evaluators, can help maximize the use of the evaluations we produce.
Evaluation
Program evaluation basics
February 14, 2018
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The ScienceMetrics blog has so far focused on our scientometric, data mining and science policy activities, but we also have a long history of conducting evaluations of S&T-related programs and initiatives. In my opinion, the most fun to be had on the job is when we team up to combine our quantitative and qualitative analysis skills on a project. To kick off a series of posts from the evaluation side of Science-Metrix, in this post I’ll present an introductory Q&A on program evaluation, and next week I’ll discuss how to maximize the use of evaluation findings. Read on for the what, why, when and how of program evaluation.
Science policy
Science advice in Canada: reborn again?
February 7, 2018
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Science advice is apparently having a “moment” right now in Canada. Quebec has had a chief scientist since 2011, but both the federal government and the Ontario provincial government named chief science advisors in the second half of 2017. For the first time, at the end of January 2018, the three chief scientists appeared publicly together, on a panel organized by the Institute for Science, Society and Policy (ISSP) at the University of Ottawa. This attracted no small number of science policy nerds. While the event was billed as a new renaissance for science advice, that does raise the question of when exactly its prior incarnations occurred. In today’s post, we’ll present a summary of the discussions, along with some critical reflections.
Bibliometrics Data mining Open access Science policy
2017: the best of ScienceMetrics.org
January 17, 2018
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Over the past year, the ScienceMetrics.org blog has grown considerably. We really appreciate our growing group of readers and all the interesting discussions that the blog has sparked. In today’s post, we’ll take a quick look back at 2017, and give you a year-in-review from our side of the “Publish” button.
Bibliometrics Science policy
Nobel laureates and the economic impact of research: a case study
December 15, 2017
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In the course of another project, I recently ran some data on the publications of 37 laureates of the Nobel prizes in Medicine, Physics and Chemistry. The results raised eyebrows in the office: they showed that those laureates, recognized for the tremendous contribution their discoveries have made to humanity, have over the course of their careers produced knowledge that has been taken up in innovation—as measured by patent citations—more widely than the work of the average US or world scientist. While this was a “quick and dirty” case study, the results exemplify the great potential of the prizewinners’ work for producing economic returns to society.
Science policy
Canadian Science: mandate update from Minister Duncan
November 29, 2017
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Kirsty Duncan (Canadian federal Minister of Science) gave a keynote address at the 9th annual Canadian Science Policy Conference in early November, during which she outlined the main priorities of her role and what she’s accomplished since being named two years ago. In our ongoing coverage of the keynote speeches from CSPC, this post will summarize her talk and highlight some critical questions.
Science policy
The new face of the science–policy interface
November 21, 2017
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The new Chief Science Advisor position is the top job at the science–policy interface in Canada. While attending the 9th Canadian Science Policy Conference in Ottawa earlier this month, the other conference-goers and I were lucky to get a glimpse of how Dr. Mona Nemer—newly named to the job—understands evidence-based decision-making. In this week’s post, I’ll give a summary of her remarks at the CSPC and distill the main views on evidence-based decision-making that they seem to reflect.
Science policy
Is non-science non-sense?
November 15, 2017
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At the beginning of November, I attended the Canadian Science Policy Conference, where one of the headline guest speakers was the new Governor General: former astronaut and currently Right Honourable Julie Payette. The Canadian science and science policy communities had an expectedly positive response to the appointment of such a scientifically minded person to this emblematic role. Her Excellency’s speech really played to the home-town crowd, too, emphasizing that science is increasingly embraced in policymaking here in Canada, and calling for science to now be increasingly embraced in society at large as well, even to the point that science would become a matter of cocktail conversation. There was a lot of controversy, though, about how Payette described the beliefs of those who have not yet been converted to our brand of discipleship, those beliefs that do not pass scientific muster. In today’s post, I’ll point out what I see as an underlying tension in her position and what a resolution might require.
Bibliometrics Science policy
Metrics: state of the alt
November 8, 2017
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Discussions of research having impact were for a long time limited to citation tracking, to estimate how much one piece of work influences subsequent explorations. However, with calls for research to have impact on the broader society—breaking out of the closed circle of research feeding yet more research—there’s a lot of interest in seeing how we might trace that impact pathway as it breaks through the membrane insulating the world of research. Altmetrics has held the promise of tracking just such traces. At STI 2017, several leading researchers on the topic gave valuable updates on the state of the art, and their estimation is that we should be seriously cooling it with all the hype. This post sums up the points that stuck out to me from their various presentations, and tries to outline my takeaway of what we should be learning from altmetrics.
Data mining Science policy
Data mining: The value of a scoping phase
August 16, 2017
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In previous posts in our data mining series, we laid out our initial technical framework for guiding data mining projects, then supplemented that with plug-ins to facilitate its use for R&I policy research specifically. These plug-ins helped to overcome the challenge of applying a generic framework to a specific thematic area. However, there was another […]