Posts Tagged: scientific integrity

Higher education Science policy
Policy: whose problem is it anyway?
March 14, 2017
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In January, Sir Peter Gluckman—Chief Science Advisor to the PM of New Zealand, and global point man for science advice to government—gave the inaugural address at the Canadian Science Policy Centre lecture series. The discussion covered a lot of important points of difficulty for science and governance—and science in governance—that are emerging in the 21st […]
Science policy
Capturing imaginations, not wallets and podiums
February 28, 2017
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The notion of capture—when one group in a partnership is allowed “home-field advantage”—is helpful in understanding some hurdles to successful collaboration across disciplinary and sectoral boundaries. Last week, I outlined how sectoral capture undermines the very notion of transdisciplinary research. In this week’s installment of the capture series, I’ll talk about how sectoral capture is […]
Higher education Science policy
Transdisciplinary research: a recipe for sectoral capture
February 21, 2017
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Now that I’ve put pen to paper and presented the notion of sectoral capture, I can finally put it to use! In this post, I’ll be exploring how sectoral capture is not only a huge risk in transdisciplinary research, but is actually embedded in the very definition of transdisciplinary research itself, calling for us to […]
Higher education Science policy
Flagging problems of capture
February 14, 2017
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The notion of disciplinary capture is a very useful conceptual tool, introduced in slightly different contexts: Brister (2016) in relation to the dynamics within interdisciplinary teams, and Frodeman, Briggle & Holbrook (2012) as well as Briggle and Frodeman (2016) in relation to the way that departmental and other academic structures influence the direction of philosophical […]
Science policy
The pressures to guide science
October 17, 2016
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“Saving Science,” the (still relatively) new article from Daniel Sarewitz published in The New Atlantis, has been getting a lot of attention in the science and science policy communities, and for good reason: the point that he’s making is one that’s very important right now in a context of government budgetary constraints and heightened scrutiny […]
Science policy
The mucky business of evidence-based policymaking
June 27, 2016
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In his recent op-ed, James Gover argues that the US federal government doesn’t have the information it needs to respond effectively to current issues such as healthcare, education and income inequality, and is failing to foresee the issues that are coming down the pike. He also notes that even in cases where high-quality information has […]